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Welcome to the Byte Blog where we share our thoughts on design, technology, and occasionally, cats.

1,000 Times Good Night at the Milwaukee Film Festival

by Sam Korthof on Sep 16, 2014

1,000 Times Good Night

Byte has been a regular supporter of the Milwaukee Film Festival, and this year we're proud to co-present 1,000 Times Good Night.

The film is about Rebecca Thomas (Juliette Binoche), a woman torn between two passions: the love she feels for her husband ("Game of Thrones" Nikolaj Coster-Waldau) and two daughters at home in Dublin and the social responsibility she feels as a war photographer sent to conflict zones to capture the devastation experienced within them. When one assignment leaves her wounded, she is made to choose once and for all between her family and career. Director Erik Poppe captures both sides of this equation with humane generosity, composing stunning images of far-flung locales while allowing luminous performances from Binoche and Coster-Waldau to encapsulate the inner struggle that this ultimatum generates.

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Tags: General News, Business

You case-insensitive bastard

by Michael Diedrick on Aug 12, 2014

JQuery is an immensely useful framework in Javascript, and even better, when it misses something, like how the ':contains' selector only finds things that are the same case, it's surprisingly easy to extend.  

$.extend($.expr[":"], {
"containsNoCase": function(elem, i, match, array) {
return (elem.textContent || elem.innerText || "").toLowerCase().indexOf((match[3] || "").toLowerCase()) >= 0;
}
});

Then change your :contains selector to :containsNoCase, like $("body:containsNoCase").each(....  And voila, you’ll shed a tear for both the little and big letters in no time.

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Visionaries

by Michael Diedrick on May 27, 2014



Long before the 1945 ideas of Vannevar Bush, known to be the seeds of the modern internet, there was a Belgian bibliographer and entrepreneur named Paul Otlet. In 1895, Otlet envisioned "Universal Libraries" as a way to give access from afar to a vast number of books.

A new piece in The Atlantic by Alex Wright, Secret History of Hypertext, describes how 40 years later Otlet refined the idea to "electric telescopes" which could deliver books, pictures, audio recordings and movies. In 1935, Otlet wrote "From a distance, everyone will be able to read text, enlarged and limited to the desired subject, projected on an individual screen. In this way, everyone from his armchair will be able to contemplate the whole of creation, in whole or in certain parts."

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Tags: Inspiration, Leading Indicators